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Find Multiples of Numbers

In this worksheet, students will find a given amount of multiples of numbers, applying knowledge of times tables.

'Find Multiples of Numbers' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 4

GCSE Subjects:   Maths

GCSE Boards:   Pearson Edexcel, OCR, Eduqas, AQA

Curriculum topic:   Number, Number Operations and Integers

Curriculum subtopic:   Structure and Calculation, Whole Number Theory

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

The word 'multiple' sounds like multiply, which can also be called 'times'.

 

Multiples are numbers in a times table.

That's it - all there is to it!

These can be really powerful to recognise and find, in order to simplify complex problems and speed up your mental maths. 

 

 

e.g. Find the first 10 multiples of 4.

 

This question means the same as 'find the first 10 numbers in the 4 times table'.

A common slip up is to forget that 4 is the first number.

If we list these multiples, we have: 

4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36, 40

 

 

 

In this activity, you will find a given amount of multiples of numbers, applying your knowledge of times tables.

Complete the sentence below to define multiples

How many possible multiples does a number have?

An infinite amount

A finite amount

Which of the lists below correctly shows the first 5 multiples of the number 9?

18, 27, 36, 45, 54

9, 18, 27, 36, 45

Find the first 10 multiples of the number 7.

 

Write your answer in ascending order (smallest to biggest) with a space between each one.

You may want to write them out on a piece of paper first to avoid any errors. 

No additional punctuation is necessary.

Which of these options is the correct first 5 multiples of the number 12?

12, 24, 36, 49, 60

12, 24, 36, 48, 60

24, 36, 48 ,60

Match each number below with its corresponding set of multiples.

Column A

Column B

12, 16, 40, 44
9
36, 24, 12, 60
6
7, 14, 35, 63
7
18, 63, 99, 9
4

Find the first 5 multiples of 21.

 

Write your answer in ascending order (smallest to biggest) with a space between each one.

You may want to write them out on a piece of paper first to avoid any errors. 

No additional punctuation is necessary.

Which of the numbers listed below are multiples of the number 8?

8

12

16

20

24

32

What are the 5 largest multiples of the number 7 that are less than 100?

 

Write your answer in ascending order (smallest to biggest) with a space between each one.

You may want to write them out on a piece of paper first to avoid any errors. 

No additional punctuation is necessary.

Select all that options below which apply. 

 

Multiples can be...

positive

negative

zero

  • Question 1

Complete the sentence below to define multiples

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
A multiple is a number that appears an answer in a times table sum. Take a moment to review the Introduction if this is at all unclear to you. If not, then get cracking with the rest of these challenges!
  • Question 2

How many possible multiples does a number have?

CORRECT ANSWER
An infinite amount
EDDIE SAYS
Think of it like this: Do times tables ever end? No, they don't. You may stop at 12 x ... but they actually stretch on for ever as the numbers reach higher and higher. You may be able to spot familiar multiples from your times tables straight away, or they may take more time and involve much larger numbers. Whichever case, these are all still multiples.
  • Question 3

Which of the lists below correctly shows the first 5 multiples of the number 9?

CORRECT ANSWER
9, 18, 27, 36, 45
EDDIE SAYS
A really common mistake when finding multiples is to forget that the first number in any times table is the first multiple. So the first multiple of 9 is 9. The following 4 numbers should be familiar from your 9 times table: 1 x 9 = 9 2 x 9 = 18 3 x 9 = 27 4 x 9 = 36 5 x 9 = 45
  • Question 4

Find the first 10 multiples of the number 7.

 

Write your answer in ascending order (smallest to biggest) with a space between each one.

You may want to write them out on a piece of paper first to avoid any errors. 

No additional punctuation is necessary.

CORRECT ANSWER
7 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63 70
EDDIE SAYS
This question in asking for a list of the first 10 numbers in the 7 times table. 1 x 7 = 7 2 x 7 = 14 etc. All the way until 10 x 7 = 70 A top tip is to check your first number represents 1 x target number and the final number represents 10 x (or whatever number of multiples you are aiming for). You can obviously still make a slip in the middle, but it's much more likely that you are on the correct track!
  • Question 5

Which of these options is the correct first 5 multiples of the number 12?

CORRECT ANSWER
12, 24, 36, 48, 60
EDDIE SAYS
Once again, we need to apply our times tables knowledge. Start at 1 x 12 and progress to 5 x 12. Always be sure to check that you have 5 numbers in your list if the question asks for 5. This advice would have helped you rule out the third list here straight away.
  • Question 6

Match each number below with its corresponding set of multiples.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

12, 16, 40, 44
4
36, 24, 12, 60
6
7, 14, 35, 63
7
18, 63, 99, 9
9
EDDIE SAYS
Read the question carefully - it didn't ask for the first four multiples, just which sets were the matching multiples. These multiples could be in ascending or descending order, or totally random. Another way to think about this is which times tables do these number sets appear in. How many did you get right here?
  • Question 7

Find the first 5 multiples of 21.

 

Write your answer in ascending order (smallest to biggest) with a space between each one.

You may want to write them out on a piece of paper first to avoid any errors. 

No additional punctuation is necessary.

CORRECT ANSWER
21 42 63 84 105
EDDIE SAYS
This question is asking for a list of the first 5 numbers in the 21 times table. Don't worry, you aren't expected to know the 21 times table off by heart! Although this does become a lot easier if you know you're basic times tables from 1-10 well. For example, you could calculate using your known times tables like this: (1 x 20) + (1 x 1) = 21 (2 x 20) + (1 x 2) = 42 etc. Remember that you can also find the 21 times table by starting at 21 and adding on 21 (and so on). Take your time with this and keep adding until you have the first 5 numbers in the sequence.
  • Question 8

Which of the numbers listed below are multiples of the number 8?

CORRECT ANSWER
8
16
24
32
EDDIE SAYS
Here you need to be asking yourself: "Are these numbers in the 8 times table?" If they are, then they're a multiple. If they aren't, then they're not multiples. Simple!
  • Question 9

What are the 5 largest multiples of the number 7 that are less than 100?

 

Write your answer in ascending order (smallest to biggest) with a space between each one.

You may want to write them out on a piece of paper first to avoid any errors. 

No additional punctuation is necessary.

CORRECT ANSWER
70 77 84 91 98
EDDIE SAYS
This style of question differs from those you have tackled earlier but the method is the same. Write out your 7 times table until you reach answers which exceed 100. The question is asking for the highest options in this list which still have answers of less than 100. These are: 7 x 10 = 70 7 x 11 = 77 7 x 12 = 84 7 x 13 = 91 7 x 14 = 98 Did you make sure you wrote them in ascending order too?
  • Question 10

Select all that options below which apply. 

 

Multiples can be...

CORRECT ANSWER
positive
negative
zero
EDDIE SAYS
We were trying to catch you out here! All the multiples we have seen in this activity have been positive, but a multiple is simply what you get if you multiply one number by another number. e.g. 5 x 2 = 10 (10 is a multiple of 5) 5 x 0 = 0 (0 is a multiple of 5) 5 x -3 = -15 (-15 is a multiple of 5) Great work completing this activity! Practise your times tables if you want to become even speedier at recognising and calculating multiples.
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