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Write a Fable!

In this worksheet, students use a familiar fable as a framework for writing their own version.

'Write a Fable!' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Writing: Composition

Curriculum subtopic:  Plan What to Write

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

A fable is a short story that has a moral, or message, telling people how to live their lives.

 

For example:

Treat others as you would like to be treated yourself.

One good turn deserves another.

Nobody believes a liar, even when he is telling the truth.

Little friends may prove to be great friends.

 

 

The characters in fables are often talking animals with particular characteristics. Foxes are usually portrayed as being cunning, owls are wise, ants are hard-working and so on.

 

Animals in the wood. Cartoon and vector illustration. - stock vector

 

It is quite easy to write your own fable if you base it on a fable you already know, but change the animals and the problem to make it your own story.

For example, you could take the fable of the boy who cried wolf, but change it to a mouse who keeps lying about being chased by a cat. Perhaps the other mice keep coming to help but get cross with the mouse and stop listening to him. Eventually a cat really chases the mouse but nobody comes to help and he is eaten.

 

In this worksheet, you can plan and write your own fable.

Now it is time to write your own fable.

  • First of all, decide on the moral of your fable, as this is the most important part. Think of the fables you already know and choose one.
  • Now plan your story. Think about what will happen to your characters and how they will act. This will help you to choose which animals to use. For example, if you want a wise character you could choose an owl, or if you want a character to be proud and vain you could choose a peacock.
  • It is best to stick to two main characters, otherwise your story will become too complicated.

 

Now write your fable in the answer box. It does not need to be very long, but remember to write in complete sentences. Don't forget to give it a title and to finish with the moral.

  • Question 1

Now it is time to write your own fable.

  • First of all, decide on the moral of your fable, as this is the most important part. Think of the fables you already know and choose one.
  • Now plan your story. Think about what will happen to your characters and how they will act. This will help you to choose which animals to use. For example, if you want a wise character you could choose an owl, or if you want a character to be proud and vain you could choose a peacock.
  • It is best to stick to two main characters, otherwise your story will become too complicated.

 

Now write your fable in the answer box. It does not need to be very long, but remember to write in complete sentences. Don't forget to give it a title and to finish with the moral.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Award a maximum of 8 marks for the fable.
  • Award one mark if the fable has an appropriate title.
  • Award up to two marks if the characters are animals with stereotypical qualities, such as a wise owl or a mischievous monkey.
  • Award up to two marks if the story is clearly told in the correct order.
  • Award up to two marks if the story is written in complete sentences with capital letters and full stops.
  • Award one mark if a moral is given at the end of the story. The moral must fit the story.
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