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Write a Passage of Dialogue

In this worksheet, students write a passage of dialogue between two friends.

'Write a Passage of Dialogue' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Writing: Composition

Curriculum subtopic:   Create Fiction

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Dialogue is the word used to describe people talking to each other in stories. Good passages of dialogue make stories more interesting to read.

 

Look at this conversation between two friends.

 

'I'm bored,' said Josh. 'Let's go outside.'

'No, I don't want to,' replied Harry. 'It's much too cold. Let's listen to music instead.'

Josh yawned and looked out of the window.

'But I don't like your music,' he grumbled. 'It's really boring. I'd rather play football.'

'I hate football and I'm not going outside!' shouted Harry. 'You go if you want to. Just leave me alone.'

'Fine,' said Jack, stamping out of the room and banging the door.

 

The boys get angry with each other and the writer of the passage shows this by using words like grumbled and shouted instead of just using said each time. A new line has been used each time there is a new speaker and other information is given to show what the boys are doing while they are talking to each other.

 

In this worksheet, you can practise writing a passage of dialogue. If you need to revise how to use speech marks you could do the worksheets on speech marks before you do this one.

First of all, think of the two people who will be having a conversation. You can use people you know or make up two names. It is easier to stick to two people, as writing dialogue for a lot of people is difficult.

 

Now think of something that they can talk about. It is often easier to write an argument than a happy conversation.

 

Write your passage of dialogue, and remember these things.

  • Use speech marks around the words that are said, and remember to use punctuation (commas, full stops, question marks, exclamation marks) as well as the closing speech marks.
  • Start a new line each time someone new speaks.
  • Try to use a range of words for speaking rather than just said.
  • Include information about what the characters are doing, not just what they are saying (such as 'Josh stamped out of the room').
  • Try to make your dialogue realistic. Does it sound like something people would really say?
  • Question 1

First of all, think of the two people who will be having a conversation. You can use people you know or make up two names. It is easier to stick to two people, as writing dialogue for a lot of people is difficult.

 

Now think of something that they can talk about. It is often easier to write an argument than a happy conversation.

 

Write your passage of dialogue, and remember these things.

  • Use speech marks around the words that are said, and remember to use punctuation (commas, full stops, question marks, exclamation marks) as well as the closing speech marks.
  • Start a new line each time someone new speaks.
  • Try to use a range of words for speaking rather than just said.
  • Include information about what the characters are doing, not just what they are saying (such as 'Josh stamped out of the room').
  • Try to make your dialogue realistic. Does it sound like something people would really say?
CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
Award a maximum of 10 marks for the dialogue.
1 and 2) Award two marks if the words spoken are enclosed in speech marks and the punctuation before the closing speech marks is correct. Award one mark is an attempt has been made to do this.
3) Award one mark if a new line is used for a new speaker each time.
4 and 5) Award up to two marks for the quality of verbs used to show speech (such as 'shouted', 'muttered' etc.).
6 and 7) Award up to two marks if information has also been given about what the characters are doing while they talk.
8 to 10) Award up to three marks for the quality of the dialogue itself, considering whether it sounds realistic or not.
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