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Introducing Mr Shakespeare! 1

In this series of worksheets, students are introduced to the language of Shakespeare.

'Introducing Mr Shakespeare! 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 3

Curriculum topic:   Reading

Curriculum subtopic:   Support Comprehension Through Knowledge

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This worksheet is designed to introduce you to Shakespeare and his plays.

 

Shakespeare was writing his plays in Elizabethan times. He wrote all his plays for the same group of actors who were based at a theatre in London called The Globe. This theatre was rebuilt in London and you can visit it today.

 

 

To answer this question you will need to do your own research about theatres in Shakespeare's time and then select the four statements below that are true.

The theatres had no roof or lighting.

People spent many hours painting elaborate scenery.

Women were forbidden to act.

The theatres had no scenery.

Plays were performed at night.

The rich people sat in the seats and the poor people stood at the front.

The Globe you see in London today has been rebuilt 230 metres from the site of Shakespeare's original Globe Theatre. Do your own research to find out which actor and director was responsible for rebuilding The Globe, when it opened to the public and which Shakespeare play was the first to be shown there.

Choose the three correct answers from the list below.

Sam Mendes

Sam Wanamaker

1997

2007

Henry V

Romeo and Juliet

Shakespeare's theatres had no lighting or scenery. This meant Shakespeare had to set the scene and time of day through the language of his plays and the audience had to use their imagination. He would often use the opening of his plays to set the scene and establish the time of day. 

Read the opening to Shakespeare's play Hamlet. The opening takes place at the King's castle in Denmark. Hamlet is visiting after the funeral of his father, the old King. The old King died in strange circumstances...

Shakespeare makes the audience imagine the time of day and sets the scene. Read the extract then answer the questions that follow.

 

 

 

 

FRANCISCO at his post. Enter to him BERNARDO

 

BERNARDO

 

Who's there?

 

FRANCISCO

 

Nay, answer me: stand, and unfold yourself.

 

BERNARDO 

 

Long live the king!

 

FRANCISCO

 

Bernardo?

 

BERNARDO 

 

He.

 

FRANCISCO 

 

You come most carefully upon your hour.

 

BERNARDO 

 

'Tis now struck twelve; get thee to bed, Francisco.

 

FRANCISCO 

 

 

For this relief much thanks: 'tis bitter cold,

And I am sick at heart.

 

BERNARDO 

 

Have you had quiet guard?

 

FRANCISCO 

 

Not a mouse stirring.

 

BERNARDO  

 

 

 

Well, good night.

If you do meet Horatio and Marcellus,

The rivals of my watch, bid them make haste. 

 

FRANCISCO 

 

I think I hear them...  

 

 

What time of day is it?

morning

afternoon

night

What time of year is it?

summer

winter

Is the castle busy or quiet?

busy

quiet

As the guards are on watch at the castle, a ghost appears. There were no special effects in Elizabethan theatre so Shakespeare has to introduce the audience to the idea of a ghost to make them imagine one.

 

Read the next part of the scene and then tick the three phrases that refer to the ghost.

 

 

FRANCISCO

 

 

I think I hear them. Stand, ho! Who's there? 

Enter HORATIO and MARCELLUS

 

HORATIO 

 

Friends to this ground.  

 

MARCELLUS 

 

And liegemen to the Dane.  

 

FRANCISCO 

 

Give you good night.  

 

MARCELLUS 

 

 

O, farewell, honest soldier:

Who hath relieved you? 

 

FRANCISCO 

 

 

 

Bernardo has my place.

Give you good night.

Exit 

 

MARCELLUS 

 

Holla! Bernardo!  

 

BERNARDO 

 

 

Say,

What, is Horatio there? 

 

HORATIO 

 

A piece of him.  

 

BERNARDO 

 

Welcome, Horatio: welcome, good Marcellus.  

 

MARCELLUS 

 

What, has this thing appear'd again to-night?  

 

BERNARDO 

 

I have seen nothing.  

 

MARCELLUS 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horatio says 'tis but our fantasy,

And will not let belief take hold of him

Touching this dreaded sight, twice seen of us:

Therefore I have entreated him along

With us to watch the minutes of this night;

That if again this apparition come,

He may approve our eyes and speak to it. 

 

HORATIO 

 

Tush, tush, 'twill not appear.  

 

BERNARDO  

 

 

 

 

Sit down awhile;

And let us once again assail your ears,

That are so fortified against our story

What we have two nights seen. 

 

HORATIO  

 

 

Well, sit we down,

And let us hear Bernardo speak of this. 

 

BERNARDO 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last night of all,

When yond same star that's westward from the pole

Had made his course to illume that part of heaven

Where now it burns, Marcellus and myself,

The bell then beating one,--

Enter Ghost 

 

MARCELLUS

 

Peace, break thee off; look, where it comes again!

 

BERNARDO

 

In the same figure, like the king that's dead.  

 

MARCELLUS

 

Thou art a scholar; speak to it, Horatio.  

 

BERNARDO 

 

Looks it not like the king? mark it, Horatio.  

 

HORATIO 

 

Most like: it harrows me with fear and wonder.  

 

BERNARDO 

It would be spoke to.  

"this thing appeared"

"tush tush"

"our fantasy"

"this dreaded sight"

"minutes of this night"

Who is the ghost, do you think?

Hamlet's father

Hamlet

Horatio

Shakespeare chose some familiar but also some very unusual settings for his plays. Can you match the following three plays with the places in which they are set?

Column A

Column B

The Tempest
Elsinore, Denmark
Hamlet
the sea and an island
King Lear
Britain
  • Question 1

Shakespeare was writing his plays in Elizabethan times. He wrote all his plays for the same group of actors who were based at a theatre in London called The Globe. This theatre was rebuilt in London and you can visit it today.

 

 

To answer this question you will need to do your own research about theatres in Shakespeare's time and then select the four statements below that are true.

CORRECT ANSWER
The theatres had no roof or lighting.
Women were forbidden to act.
The theatres had no scenery.
The rich people sat in the seats and the poor people stood at the front.
EDDIE SAYS
Theatres in Shakespeare's time had no roof or lighting, no scenery and women were forbidden to act. Plays took place in the afternoon and the rich people sat in seats while the poor stood at the front.
  • Question 2

The Globe you see in London today has been rebuilt 230 metres from the site of Shakespeare's original Globe Theatre. Do your own research to find out which actor and director was responsible for rebuilding The Globe, when it opened to the public and which Shakespeare play was the first to be shown there.

Choose the three correct answers from the list below.

CORRECT ANSWER
Sam Wanamaker
1997
Henry V
EDDIE SAYS
The Globe was rebuilt by Sam Wanamaker in 1997 and opened with the play Henry V.
  • Question 3

Shakespeare's theatres had no lighting or scenery. This meant Shakespeare had to set the scene and time of day through the language of his plays and the audience had to use their imagination. He would often use the opening of his plays to set the scene and establish the time of day. 

Read the opening to Shakespeare's play Hamlet. The opening takes place at the King's castle in Denmark. Hamlet is visiting after the funeral of his father, the old King. The old King died in strange circumstances...

Shakespeare makes the audience imagine the time of day and sets the scene. Read the extract then answer the questions that follow.

 

 

 

 

FRANCISCO at his post. Enter to him BERNARDO

 

BERNARDO

 

Who's there?

 

FRANCISCO

 

Nay, answer me: stand, and unfold yourself.

 

BERNARDO 

 

Long live the king!

 

FRANCISCO

 

Bernardo?

 

BERNARDO 

 

He.

 

FRANCISCO 

 

You come most carefully upon your hour.

 

BERNARDO 

 

'Tis now struck twelve; get thee to bed, Francisco.

 

FRANCISCO 

 

 

For this relief much thanks: 'tis bitter cold,

And I am sick at heart.

 

BERNARDO 

 

Have you had quiet guard?

 

FRANCISCO 

 

Not a mouse stirring.

 

BERNARDO  

 

 

 

Well, good night.

If you do meet Horatio and Marcellus,

The rivals of my watch, bid them make haste. 

 

FRANCISCO 

 

I think I hear them...  

 

 

What time of day is it?

CORRECT ANSWER
night
EDDIE SAYS
It is night time - after midnight.
  • Question 4

What time of year is it?

CORRECT ANSWER
winter
EDDIE SAYS
It is winter as Shakespeare describes how it is "bitter cold".
  • Question 5

Is the castle busy or quiet?

CORRECT ANSWER
quiet
EDDIE SAYS
The castle is quiet.
  • Question 6

As the guards are on watch at the castle, a ghost appears. There were no special effects in Elizabethan theatre so Shakespeare has to introduce the audience to the idea of a ghost to make them imagine one.

 

Read the next part of the scene and then tick the three phrases that refer to the ghost.

 

 

FRANCISCO

 

 

I think I hear them. Stand, ho! Who's there? 

Enter HORATIO and MARCELLUS

 

HORATIO 

 

Friends to this ground.  

 

MARCELLUS 

 

And liegemen to the Dane.  

 

FRANCISCO 

 

Give you good night.  

 

MARCELLUS 

 

 

O, farewell, honest soldier:

Who hath relieved you? 

 

FRANCISCO 

 

 

 

Bernardo has my place.

Give you good night.

Exit 

 

MARCELLUS 

 

Holla! Bernardo!  

 

BERNARDO 

 

 

Say,

What, is Horatio there? 

 

HORATIO 

 

A piece of him.  

 

BERNARDO 

 

Welcome, Horatio: welcome, good Marcellus.  

 

MARCELLUS 

 

What, has this thing appear'd again to-night?  

 

BERNARDO 

 

I have seen nothing.  

 

MARCELLUS 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horatio says 'tis but our fantasy,

And will not let belief take hold of him

Touching this dreaded sight, twice seen of us:

Therefore I have entreated him along

With us to watch the minutes of this night;

That if again this apparition come,

He may approve our eyes and speak to it. 

 

HORATIO 

 

Tush, tush, 'twill not appear.  

 

BERNARDO  

 

 

 

 

Sit down awhile;

And let us once again assail your ears,

That are so fortified against our story

What we have two nights seen. 

 

HORATIO  

 

 

Well, sit we down,

And let us hear Bernardo speak of this. 

 

BERNARDO 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last night of all,

When yond same star that's westward from the pole

Had made his course to illume that part of heaven

Where now it burns, Marcellus and myself,

The bell then beating one,--

Enter Ghost 

 

MARCELLUS

 

Peace, break thee off; look, where it comes again!

 

BERNARDO

 

In the same figure, like the king that's dead.  

 

MARCELLUS

 

Thou art a scholar; speak to it, Horatio.  

 

BERNARDO 

 

Looks it not like the king? mark it, Horatio.  

 

HORATIO 

 

Most like: it harrows me with fear and wonder.  

 

BERNARDO 

It would be spoke to.  

CORRECT ANSWER
"this thing appeared"
"our fantasy"
"this dreaded sight"
EDDIE SAYS
References to the ghost are: "this thing appeared", "our fantasy" and "this dreaded sight".
  • Question 7

Who is the ghost, do you think?

CORRECT ANSWER
Hamlet's father
EDDIE SAYS
The ghost is Hamlet's father, the dead King.
  • Question 8

Shakespeare chose some familiar but also some very unusual settings for his plays. Can you match the following three plays with the places in which they are set?

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

The Tempest
the sea and an island
Hamlet
Elsinore, Denmark
King Lear
Britain
EDDIE SAYS
The Tempest was set in the sea and on an island.
Hamlet was set in Elsinore, Denmark.
King Lear was set in Britain.
---- OR ----

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