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Introducing Mr Shakespeare! 2

In this series of worksheets, students are introduced to the plays of William Shakespeare.

'Introducing Mr Shakespeare! 2' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 3

Curriculum topic:  Reading

Curriculum subtopic:  Study Authors

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

This worksheet is designed to introduce you to the plays of William Shakespeare.

 

Shakespeare was very clever with language. In a famous speech from his play As You Like It, he makes the audience imagine the whole lifespan of a person in just 27 lines!

Read the speech and, to help you understand it, match the Shakespearean words with their modern meaning below.

 

JACQUES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All the world's a stage,

And all the men and women merely players:

They have their exits and their entrances;

And one man in his time plays many parts,

His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,

Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.

And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel

And shining morning face, creeping like snail

Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,

Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad

Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,

Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,

Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,

Seeking the bubble reputation

Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,

In fair round belly with good capon lined,

With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,

Full of wise saws and modern instances;

And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts

Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon,

With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,

His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide

For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,

Turning again toward childish treble, pipes

And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,

That ends this strange eventful history,

Is second childishness and mere oblivion,

Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

Column A

Column B

players
comic figure of a very old man
mewling
forgotten
justice
crying baby noise
pantaloon
actors
oblivion
without
sans
magistrate

Now imagine the speech as a cartoon strip of the seven ages of man. For each section, select which image is best suited.

Here is the description for the first image.

 

At first the infant,

Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.

 

A B
A

B

Here is the description for image two.

 

And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel

And shining morning face, creeping like snail

Unwillingly to school.

 

A B
A

B

Here is the description for image three.

 

And then the lover,

Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad

Made to his mistress' eyebrow.

 

A B
A

B

This is the description for image four.

 

Then a soldier,

Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,

Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,

Seeking the bubble reputation

Even in the cannon's mouth.

 

A B
A

B

Here is the description for image five.

 

And then the justice,

In fair round belly with good capon lined,

With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,

Full of wise saws and modern instances;

And so he plays his part.

 

A B
A

B

This is the description for image six.

 

The sixth age shifts

Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon,

With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,

His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide

For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,

Turning again toward childish treble, pipes

And whistles in his sound.

 

A B
A

B

The seventh and final age of man.

 

Last scene of all,

That ends this strange eventful history,

Is second childishness and mere oblivion,

Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

 

A B
A

B

Now have a go at reading the speech out loud, acting the seven ages of man as you go:

 

JACQUES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All the world's a stage,

And all the men and women merely players:

They have their exits and their entrances;

And one man in his time plays many parts,

His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,

Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.

And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel

And shining morning face, creeping like snail

Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,

Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad

Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,

Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,

Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,

Seeking the bubble reputation

Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,

In fair round belly with good capon lined,

With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,

Full of wise saws and modern instances;

And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts

Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon,

With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,

His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide

For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,

Turning again toward childish treble, pipes

And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,

That ends this strange eventful history,

Is second childishness and mere oblivion,

Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

Tick when you have done this.

The seven ages of man speech comes from the play As You Like it. Why do you think Shakespeare includes this speech?

to make the audience feel lucky that they are not old

to make the audience think about the cycle of life

to make the audience want to be a baby again

  • Question 1

Shakespeare was very clever with language. In a famous speech from his play As You Like It, he makes the audience imagine the whole lifespan of a person in just 27 lines!

Read the speech and, to help you understand it, match the Shakespearean words with their modern meaning below.

 

JACQUES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All the world's a stage,

And all the men and women merely players:

They have their exits and their entrances;

And one man in his time plays many parts,

His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,

Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.

And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel

And shining morning face, creeping like snail

Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,

Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad

Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,

Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,

Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,

Seeking the bubble reputation

Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,

In fair round belly with good capon lined,

With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,

Full of wise saws and modern instances;

And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts

Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon,

With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,

His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide

For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,

Turning again toward childish treble, pipes

And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,

That ends this strange eventful history,

Is second childishness and mere oblivion,

Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

players
actors
mewling
crying baby noise
justice
magistrate
pantaloon
comic figure of a very old man
oblivion
forgotten
sans
without
EDDIE SAYS
players = actors
mewling = crying
justice = magistrate
pantaloon = comic figure of a very old man
oblivion = forgotten
sans = without
  • Question 2

Now imagine the speech as a cartoon strip of the seven ages of man. For each section, select which image is best suited.

Here is the description for the first image.

 

At first the infant,

Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.

 

A B
CORRECT ANSWER
A
EDDIE SAYS
The picture of the crying baby is correct. A
  • Question 3

Here is the description for image two.

 

And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel

And shining morning face, creeping like snail

Unwillingly to school.

 

A B
CORRECT ANSWER
A
EDDIE SAYS
This should be a picture of a sad school boy. A
  • Question 4

Here is the description for image three.

 

And then the lover,

Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad

Made to his mistress' eyebrow.

 

A B
CORRECT ANSWER
B
EDDIE SAYS
This should be a picture of a man in love. B
  • Question 5

This is the description for image four.

 

Then a soldier,

Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,

Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,

Seeking the bubble reputation

Even in the cannon's mouth.

 

A B
CORRECT ANSWER
A
EDDIE SAYS
This should be a picture of a soldier. A
  • Question 6

Here is the description for image five.

 

And then the justice,

In fair round belly with good capon lined,

With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,

Full of wise saws and modern instances;

And so he plays his part.

 

A B
CORRECT ANSWER
B
EDDIE SAYS
This should be a picture of an overweight judge. B
  • Question 7

This is the description for image six.

 

The sixth age shifts

Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon,

With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,

His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide

For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,

Turning again toward childish treble, pipes

And whistles in his sound.

 

A B
CORRECT ANSWER
A
EDDIE SAYS
This should be a picture of a skinny old man. A
  • Question 8

The seventh and final age of man.

 

Last scene of all,

That ends this strange eventful history,

Is second childishness and mere oblivion,

Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

 

A B
CORRECT ANSWER
A
EDDIE SAYS
A picture of a man who has lost hair, teeth and memory. A
  • Question 9

Now have a go at reading the speech out loud, acting the seven ages of man as you go:

 

JACQUES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All the world's a stage,

And all the men and women merely players:

They have their exits and their entrances;

And one man in his time plays many parts,

His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,

Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.

And then the whining school-boy, with his satchel

And shining morning face, creeping like snail

Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,

Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad

Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,

Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,

Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,

Seeking the bubble reputation

Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,

In fair round belly with good capon lined,

With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,

Full of wise saws and modern instances;

And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts

Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon,

With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,

His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide

For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,

Turning again toward childish treble, pipes

And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,

That ends this strange eventful history,

Is second childishness and mere oblivion,

Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

CORRECT ANSWER
Tick when you have done this.
  • Question 10

The seven ages of man speech comes from the play As You Like it. Why do you think Shakespeare includes this speech?

CORRECT ANSWER
to make the audience think about the cycle of life
EDDIE SAYS
This speech is included in the play to make the audience think about the cycle of life.
---- OR ----

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