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Grammatical Boundaries: Using Commas in Sentences

In this worksheet, students use commas to demarcate additional information in a sentence.

'Grammatical Boundaries: Using Commas in Sentences' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Writing: Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation

Curriculum subtopic:   Use Commas to Clarify

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Read the following sentence.

Jack plays the violin.

 

Boy playing the violin

 

This doesn't say who Jack is, so we could add a second sentence to let readers know.

Jack plays the violin. Jack is my brother.

 

Although this makes sense, it sounds better to add the extra information to the first sentence.

Jack, my brother, plays the violin.

 

We use commas to make the sentence easier to read and understand. Without the commas it would look strange.

Jack my brother plays the violin.

 

The commas always go around the extra piece of information.

Mr Smith mended our washing machine. Mr Smith is our plumber.

Mr Smith, our plumber, mended our washing machine.

Write out the following sentence, adding commas in the correct places.

 

Holly my dog loves chasing rabbits.

Write out the following sentence, adding commas in the correct places.

 

Dwayne my best friend is coming to my party.

Write out the following sentence, adding commas in the correct places.

 

Neela my baby sitter is coming over tonight.

Write out the following sentence, adding commas in the correct places.

 

Miss Johnson my teacher is leaving in the summer.

Write out the following sentence, adding commas in the correct places.

 

Jacob my next door neighbour is going to Spain on holiday.

For the next five questions you need to write one sentence by adding the information from the second sentence to the first sentence. Write the new sentence in the box and don't forget the commas.

(For example: John is nine tomorrow. John is my brother. This becomes John, my brother, is nine tomorrow.)

 

Tibby loves milk. Tibby is my cat.

Write one sentence by adding the information from the second sentence to the first sentence.

 

Jim delivered my birthday cards. Jim is the postman.

Write one sentence by adding the information from the second sentence to the first sentence.

 

Jonny took five catches in the match. Jonny is our wicket keeper.

Write one sentence by adding the information from the second sentence to the first sentence.

 

Annie sent me a necklace for my birthday. Annie is my cousin.

Write one sentence by adding the information from the second sentence to the first sentence.

 

Kim sits next to me in class. Kim is my best friend.

  • Question 1

Write out the following sentence, adding commas in the correct places.

 

Holly my dog loves chasing rabbits.

CORRECT ANSWER
Holly, my dog, loves chasing rabbits.
EDDIE SAYS
Great to see you having a go! A good way to remember how to do this, is to think that what ever group of words you put within the commas could be removed from the sentence without changing the meaning. In this example 'Holly loves chasing cats.' Although this does not tell the reader who 'Holly' is, it still tells the reader she likes to chase cats. 'My dog' is extra information, that is helpful to reader, so it is this that goes within the commas.
  • Question 2

Write out the following sentence, adding commas in the correct places.

 

Dwayne my best friend is coming to my party.

CORRECT ANSWER
Dwayne, my best friend, is coming to my party.
EDDIE SAYS
Great work! Look for the extra information. 'My best friend' is not essential to the reader. Without it the reader will still understand that 'Dwayne' is going to the party.
  • Question 3

Write out the following sentence, adding commas in the correct places.

 

Neela my baby sitter is coming over tonight.

CORRECT ANSWER
Neela, my baby sitter, is coming over tonight.
EDDIE SAYS
You getting the hang of this?A good rule to remember is that the commas should appear after the noun. In this example 'Neela' is the noun. 'My baby sitter' is helpful for the reader to know, but it is not essential. Without it the rest of the sentence would still make sense. Keep it up!
  • Question 4

Write out the following sentence, adding commas in the correct places.

 

Miss Johnson my teacher is leaving in the summer.

CORRECT ANSWER
Miss Johnson, my teacher, is leaving in the summer.
EDDIE SAYS
High five for effort! What information is not essential to the sentence and would not make sense on its own. 'My teacher' goes within the commas as it relies on the rest of the sentence to give it meaning. You got this!
  • Question 5

Write out the following sentence, adding commas in the correct places.

 

Jacob my next door neighbour is going to Spain on holiday.

CORRECT ANSWER
Jacob, my next door neighbour, is going to Spain on holiday.
EDDIE SAYS
The reader does not need to know who 'Jacob' is, but 'my next door neighbour' is extra information that helps the reader to get a better understanding. You use commas around this information to help the sentence flow better for the reader.
  • Question 6

For the next five questions you need to write one sentence by adding the information from the second sentence to the first sentence. Write the new sentence in the box and don't forget the commas.

(For example: John is nine tomorrow. John is my brother. This becomes John, my brother, is nine tomorrow.)

 

Tibby loves milk. Tibby is my cat.

CORRECT ANSWER
Tibby, my cat, loves milk.
EDDIE SAYS
The trick here is to remember that a comma generally follows the noun. The noun in this sentence is 'Tibby'. 'My cat' does not make sense on it's own and relies on the main sentence for meaning. Your doing great!
  • Question 7

Write one sentence by adding the information from the second sentence to the first sentence.

 

Jim delivered my birthday cards. Jim is the postman.

CORRECT ANSWER
Jim, the postman, delivered my birthday cards.
EDDIE SAYS
In this example you need to tell the reader extra information about 'Jim'. What extra information can you tell the reader? Telling the reader that 'Jim' is a postman is helpful and gives the sentence more meaning. Don't forget your commas!
  • Question 8

Write one sentence by adding the information from the second sentence to the first sentence.

 

Jonny took five catches in the match. Jonny is our wicket keeper.

CORRECT ANSWER
Jonny, our wicket keeper, took five catches in the match.
EDDIE SAYS
You got this! The main information we want the reader to know is that 'Jonny took five catches in the match.' We can give the reader a better understanding of 'Jonny' by including who he is within the team. 'Our wicket keeper' needs to come after the noun 'Jonny' but nothing else in the main sentence should change. Nearly there!
  • Question 9

Write one sentence by adding the information from the second sentence to the first sentence.

 

Annie sent me a necklace for my birthday. Annie is my cousin.

CORRECT ANSWER
Annie, my cousin, sent me a necklace for my birthday.
EDDIE SAYS
Did you get it correct? What extra can you tell the reader about 'Annie'. 'My cousin' gives the reader a better idea of who she is. Remember the extra information should be inserted after the noun (Annie), then the rest of the sentence continues. Don't forget to use commas! Super effort!
  • Question 10

Write one sentence by adding the information from the second sentence to the first sentence.

 

Kim sits next to me in class. Kim is my best friend.

CORRECT ANSWER
Kim, my best friend, sits next to me in class.
EDDIE SAYS
High five! I bet your an expert now! Telling the reader who 'Kim' is gives more meaning to the sentence. 'My best friend' comes after the noun 'Kim'. Super work well done!
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