The smart way to improve grades

Comprehensive & curriculum aligned

Affordable pricing from £10/month

Sentence Structure: Commas and Subordinate Clauses 2

In this worksheet, students practise creating complex sentences and putting commas in the correct places.

'Sentence Structure: Commas and Subordinate Clauses 2' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:  Writing: Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation

Curriculum subtopic:  Use Commas to Clarify

Difficulty level:  

down

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

Two simple sentences can be combined into one complex sentence with a main clause and a subordinate clause.

My dog is called Freddie. My dog likes bones. (simple sentences)

My dog, who likes bones, is called Freddie. (complex sentence)

 

The main clause makes sense on its own.

My dog, who likes bones, is called Freddie.

 

The subordinate clause does not make sense on its own.

My dog, who likes bones, is called Freddie.

 

We need to put commas around the subordinate clause to make the sentence easier to read and understand.

 

The two sentences could also be combined in a different way, so that the information about the bones is the main clause and the dog's name is the subordinate clause.

My dog, who is called Freddie, likes bones.

 

When we combine sentences in this way, we use the linking word who for people and pets and which for other animals and non-living things.

The tiger, which had finished its meal, was lying under the tree.

The car, which had cost a lot of money, was parked on the drive.

The following simple sentences can be combined into a complex sentence.

My parrot is called Peter. (main clause)

My parrot likes sunflower seeds. (subordinate clause)

This becomes: My parrot, who likes sunflower seeds, is called Peter.

 

Do the same for these two sentences and write your answer in the box.

 

My cat is called Sooty. (main clause)

My cat likes fish. (subordinate clause)

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

The lion was pacing around its cage. (main clause)

The lion was hungry. (subordinate clause)

 

(Tip: Use which as a linking word.)

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

The tractor was ploughing the field. (main clause)

The tractor was very old. (subordinate clause)

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

My auntie Mary does a lot of knitting. (main clause)

She lives on her own. (subordinate clause)

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

My dog Sheba has won a lot of prizes at shows. (main clause)

She is a pedigree corgi. (subordinate clause)

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

Mount Everest is in Nepal. (main clause)

It is the world's highest mountain. (subordinate clause)

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

Jennifer has lost her dinner money. (main clause)

She is my best friend. (subordinate clause)

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

Shaun is playing in a match on Saturday. (main clause)

He is very good at cricket. (subordinate clause)

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

Sheep eat a lot of grass. (main clause)

They are herbivores. (subordinate clause)

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

Sid let in lots of goals today. (main clause)

He is the reserve goalkeeper. (subordinate clause)

  • Question 1

The following simple sentences can be combined into a complex sentence.

My parrot is called Peter. (main clause)

My parrot likes sunflower seeds. (subordinate clause)

This becomes: My parrot, who likes sunflower seeds, is called Peter.

 

Do the same for these two sentences and write your answer in the box.

 

My cat is called Sooty. (main clause)

My cat likes fish. (subordinate clause)

CORRECT ANSWER
My cat, who likes fish, is called Sooty.
EDDIE SAYS
Don't forget to put commas around the subordinate clause 'who likes fish'.
  • Question 2

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

The lion was pacing around its cage. (main clause)

The lion was hungry. (subordinate clause)

 

(Tip: Use which as a linking word.)

CORRECT ANSWER
The lion, which was hungry, was pacing around its cage.
EDDIE SAYS
The subordinate clause is 'which was hungry'.
  • Question 3

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

The tractor was ploughing the field. (main clause)

The tractor was very old. (subordinate clause)

CORRECT ANSWER
The tractor, which was very old, was ploughing the field.
EDDIE SAYS
The linking word is 'which' because a tractor isn't alive.
  • Question 4

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

My auntie Mary does a lot of knitting. (main clause)

She lives on her own. (subordinate clause)

CORRECT ANSWER
My auntie Mary, who lives on her own, does a lot of knitting.
EDDIE SAYS
We use 'who' as a linking word because Mary is a person.
  • Question 5

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

My dog Sheba has won a lot of prizes at shows. (main clause)

She is a pedigree corgi. (subordinate clause)

CORRECT ANSWER
My dog Sheba, who is a pedigree corgi, has won a lot of prizes at shows.
EDDIE SAYS
We use 'who' as a linking word because Sheba is a pet, not just a wild animal.
  • Question 6

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

Mount Everest is in Nepal. (main clause)

It is the world's highest mountain. (subordinate clause)

CORRECT ANSWER
Mount Everest, which is the world's highest mountain, is in Nepal.
EDDIE SAYS
The linking word is 'which' because a mountain is not alive.
  • Question 7

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

Jennifer has lost her dinner money. (main clause)

She is my best friend. (subordinate clause)

CORRECT ANSWER
Jennifer, who is my best friend, has lost her dinner money.
EDDIE SAYS
Jennifer is a person so the linking word is 'who'.
  • Question 8

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

Shaun is playing in a match on Saturday. (main clause)

He is very good at cricket. (subordinate clause)

CORRECT ANSWER
Shaun, who is very good at cricket, is playing in a match on Saturday.
EDDIE SAYS
Shaun is a person so the linking word is 'who'.
  • Question 9

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

Sheep eat a lot of grass. (main clause)

They are herbivores. (subordinate clause)

CORRECT ANSWER
Sheep, which are herbivores, eat a lot of grass.
EDDIE SAYS
Although sheep are alive they are not normally pets so the correct word is 'which'. If you were talking about a pet sheep with a name, then you could use 'who'.
  • Question 10

Combine these simple sentences into a complex sentence. Don't forget the commas!

 

Sid let in lots of goals today. (main clause)

He is the reserve goalkeeper. (subordinate clause)

CORRECT ANSWER
Sid, who is the reserve goalkeeper, let in lots of goals today.
EDDIE SAYS
Sid is a person so the correct word is 'who'.
---- OR ----

Sign up for a £1 trial so you can track and measure your child's progress on this activity.

What is EdPlace?

We're your National Curriculum aligned online education content provider helping each child succeed in English, maths and science from year 1 to GCSE. With an EdPlace account you’ll be able to track and measure progress, helping each child achieve their best. We build confidence and attainment by personalising each child’s learning at a level that suits them.

Start your £1 trial

Start your trial for £1