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Sentence Structure: Manipulating for Effect 3

In this worksheet, students practise moving embedded clauses to the beginning of sentences to vary the effect for readers.

'Sentence Structure: Manipulating for Effect 3' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Writing: Composition

Curriculum subtopic:   Grammar and Vocabulary Awareness

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

A subordinate clause can be embedded inside a main clause.

Fido, who was snoring happily by the fire, didn't hear the burglars enter the house.

 

One way of varying the structure of writing to make it more interesting is to move an embedded clause to the beginning of a sentence. The pronoun (who) and the first part of the verb (was) are left out.

Snoring happily by the fire, Fido didn't hear the burglars enter the house.

 

This works for verbs ending in -ed as well as those ending in -ing.

The captain, who was supported on the shoulders of his team mates, waved to the crowd.

Supported on the shoulders of his team mates, the captain waved to the crowd.

 

Moving the embedded clause to the beginning of the sentence gives it greater emphasis, but it is not necessary to do so all the time. It is often worth trying both ways to see which has a better effect.

Rewrite this sentence so that it begins with the -ing verb.

 

The princess, who was wearing a diamond tiara, rode past in her carriage.

Rewrite this sentence so that it begins with the -ing verb.

 

The woman, who was carrying a jug on her head, walked miles to find water for her family.

Rewrite this sentence so that it begins with the -ing verb.

 

The dog, which was gnawing at a bone, growled at anyone who came near.

Rewrite this sentence so that it begins with the -ed verb.

 

Dad's new bike, which was painted bright red, stood on the drive.

Rewrite this sentence so that it begins with the -ed verb.

 

The shopping trolley, which was loaded with cans of beer, overturned in the aisle.

Rewrite this sentence so that it begins with the -ed verb.

 

The climbers, who were buried for half an hour by the avalanche, were finally dug out safely by the mountain rescue team.

Rewrite this sentence so that it begins with the first -ing verb.

 

The cats, who were hissing and scratching, chased each other around the garden.

Read these two sentences.

 

1) Liam, who was helped by Paul, finished his model of the Eiffel Tower.

2) Helped by Paul, Liam finished his model of the Eiffel Tower.

 

Which one emphasises the help given by Paul?

sentence 1

sentence 2

Read these two sentences.

 

1) Neela, who was dressed as a pirate, won the fancy dress competition.

2) Dressed as a pirate, Neela won the fancy dress competition.

 

Which sentence would be better if you wanted to emphasise who won the competition?

sentence 1

sentence 2

Read these two sentences.

 

1) Joshua, who was uncertain who he should trust, looked around for help.

2) Uncertain who he could trust, Joshua looked around for help.

 

If the previous sentence was also about Joshua, which of these two sentences would be more effective?

sentence 1

sentence 2

  • Question 1

Rewrite this sentence so that it begins with the -ing verb.

 

The princess, who was wearing a diamond tiara, rode past in her carriage.

CORRECT ANSWER
Wearing a diamond tiara, the princess rode past in her carriage.
EDDIE SAYS
Excellent effort! To do this you need to change the word order. Bring the clause with the verb 'wearing' to the start of the sentence and move the original clause to after. This highlights what the 'Princess' was wearing to the reader.
  • Question 2

Rewrite this sentence so that it begins with the -ing verb.

 

The woman, who was carrying a jug on her head, walked miles to find water for her family.

CORRECT ANSWER
Carrying a jug on her head, the woman walked miles to find water for her family.
EDDIE SAYS
Again here you need to bring the verb ending in 'ing' to the start of the sentence. Then the pronoun follows and the rest of the sentence continues
  • Question 3

Rewrite this sentence so that it begins with the -ing verb.

 

The dog, which was gnawing at a bone, growled at anyone who came near.

CORRECT ANSWER
Gnawing at a bone, the dog growled at anyone who came near.
  • Question 4

Rewrite this sentence so that it begins with the -ed verb.

 

Dad's new bike, which was painted bright red, stood on the drive.

CORRECT ANSWER
Painted bright red, Dad's new bike stood on the drive.
EDDIE SAYS
Super effort! In this example the verb 'painted' is move to the start of the sentence and the word order is changed. This put's more emphasis on the colour of the car and add interest to the reader.
  • Question 5

Rewrite this sentence so that it begins with the -ed verb.

 

The shopping trolley, which was loaded with cans of beer, overturned in the aisle.

CORRECT ANSWER
Loaded with cans of beer, the shopping trolley overturned in the aisle.
EDDIE SAYS
You getting the hang of this? Keep it up the great effort. Just remember you need to move the verb to the start of the sentence.
  • Question 6

Rewrite this sentence so that it begins with the -ed verb.

 

The climbers, who were buried for half an hour by the avalanche, were finally dug out safely by the mountain rescue team.

CORRECT ANSWER
Buried for half an hour by the avalanche, the climbers were finally dug out safely by the mountain rescue team.
EDDIE SAYS
Did you get it right? The sentence still needs to make sense and have the same meaning. You just need to being the verb ending in 'ed' to the beginning. You've got this!
  • Question 7

Rewrite this sentence so that it begins with the first -ing verb.

 

The cats, who were hissing and scratching, chased each other around the garden.

CORRECT ANSWER
Hissing and scratching, the cats chased each other around the garden.
EDDIE SAYS
Starting the sentence with 'Hissing and scratching' makes the sentence more interesting and highlights the behaviour of the cats. Nearly there super star!
  • Question 8

Read these two sentences.

 

1) Liam, who was helped by Paul, finished his model of the Eiffel Tower.

2) Helped by Paul, Liam finished his model of the Eiffel Tower.

 

Which one emphasises the help given by Paul?

CORRECT ANSWER
sentence 2
EDDIE SAYS
The second sentence starts with the idea that 'Paul was helping'. This highlights the information to the reader.
  • Question 9

Read these two sentences.

 

1) Neela, who was dressed as a pirate, won the fancy dress competition.

2) Dressed as a pirate, Neela won the fancy dress competition.

 

Which sentence would be better if you wanted to emphasise who won the competition?

CORRECT ANSWER
sentence 1
EDDIE SAYS
Great job! The second sentence puts more emphasis on what she was wearing.
  • Question 10

Read these two sentences.

 

1) Joshua, who was uncertain who he should trust, looked around for help.

2) Uncertain who he could trust, Joshua looked around for help.

 

If the previous sentence was also about Joshua, which of these two sentences would be more effective?

CORRECT ANSWER
sentence 2
EDDIE SAYS
High five! If we already know that we are focusing on Joshua, then there is no need to start the next sentence with his name. The second version would be more effective.
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