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Report on Your Investigation 1

In this worksheet, students will examine and explore the important aspect of how to report on their investigations, their findings and their suggestions for further work.

'Report on Your Investigation 1' worksheet

Key stage:  KS 2

Curriculum topic:   Exam-Style Questions: SATs Science

Curriculum subtopic:   Exam-Style Questions: Reporting

Difficulty level:  

Worksheet Overview

QUESTION 1 of 10

When the dust has settled, the investigation has been completed, the results gathered and you've drawn a conclusion from the data, is that it?  Surely the world needs to know what's been found out? 

Well, certainly your teacher, parent, friend or teddy-bear will be interested! After all, a lot of hard work and thought has gone into trying to find out the answer to a question. That's why the final part of the investigative process is reporting on it - writing it all up, explaining what's been going on, and so on.

 

 

Wondering...

 

Your EdPlace team have been putting together a series of activities based on that all-important part of science - in many ways, the heart ​ Image result for heart symbol  of science - which is doing investigations, the only way to truly discover the answer to a whole host of questions.

 

So, here we are at the final stage - reporting your findings. 

What should that look like? How long should it be? Should all your data be in there? 

 

At the top end of science, these 'reports' are published in scientific journals and are what push science, and the world, forward, initiating discussion and further work. So, let's have a look at what needs to go into a scientific report.

 

Charts

 

 

Zach was interested in finding out how well different materials conduct electricity. He had constructed an electric circuit and placed different items into the circuit (by clipping crocodile clips on to them) and looking at how brightly the bulb glowed. 

Below is the circuit he used:

 

Conductor-testing circuit

 

Below are a list of the different aspects of the investigation that Zach needs to include in his report. 

 

Place them in the order in which they should appear in that report (1 for 'first', and so on).

Column A

Column B

Carrying out the experiments.
5
Drawing conclusions.
2
Planning the investigation.
1
Recording results.
6
Measuring data.
4
Writing the report.
3

Zach identified a number of variables which could affect his results. 

 

In which part of his report should he outline what these variables are?

Planning the investigation.

Drawing conclusions.

Carrying out the experiment.

Reporting on the investigation.

Recording results.

Measuring data.

Zach made a prediction: "I expect that the paperclip, the pencil sharpener and the spoon will light the bulb but that the pencil, the ruler and the pad of paper will not."

 

Where in his report should Zach include his prediction?

Planning the investigation.

Drawing conclusions.

Carrying out the experiment.

Reporting on the investigation.

Recording results.

Measuring data.

In his report, Zach needs to include a hypothesis

 

Which one of these is a likely hypothesis for his investigation?

 

1. "Metals are good conductors; non-metals don't conduct electricity."

2. "Metals are better conductors of electricity."

3. "I expect that objects made of metal are more likely to conduct than those made on non-metals."

 

1

2

3

Zach had a variety of items to place in the circuit to see whether the bulb would light up.

 

In his report, which of the following would be the best way of displaying his results?

A table.

A bar chart.

A scatter graph.

A pie chart.

Here is Zach's prediction again:

 

"I expect that the paperclip, the pencil sharpener and the spoon will light the bulb but that the pencil, the ruler and the pad of paper will not."

 

In his results, he found that the paperclip, pencil sharpener and spoon (all made of metal) made the bulb glow brightly.

 

When he connected the plastic ruler and pad of paper, the bulb didn't light up.

 

The pencil he used looked like this:

 

double-ended pencil

 

When he connected it, Zach found that the bulb glowed dimly.

 

How should Zach reflect these findings in his report? 

Fill in the gaps in this sentence.

A table.

A bar chart.

A scatter graph.

A pie chart.

What is the name of the substance inside the pencil which is causing this unexpected result in Zach's experiment?

 

 

Pencil

Graphite

Lead

Aluminium

Copper

Zach's original experiment was to find out how well different materials are at conducting electricity. 

 

His results showed him that some materials don't conduct electricity at all, some conduct a little and some conduct it well.

 

Match each of the objects he tested with how well they conduct electricity.

 Good ConductorPoor ConductorNon-Conductor/Insulator
Metal paperclip
Sharpened pencil
Paper pad
Metal spoon
Plastic ruler
Metal pencil sharpener

In his report, Zach suggested that using the brightness of a bulb to measure how well an object conducts electricity is not a very reliable method for deciding how good a conductor it is.

 

What factors do you think caused Zach to re-think his method for measuring how good a conductor an object is? 

A bulb is only 'on' or 'off'.

It's difficult to measure how brightly a bulb is lit up.

A bulb may allow electric current through without lighting up.

Light bulbs are fragile.

Zach decided that a better way to measure how well different materials are at conducting electricity would be to use some sort of "current-measuring meter" (that's what he wrote in his report).

 

Can you help him out with the name of a device that will do the job?

Ammeter

Voltmeter

Electricity meter

Light meter

  • Question 1

Zach was interested in finding out how well different materials conduct electricity. He had constructed an electric circuit and placed different items into the circuit (by clipping crocodile clips on to them) and looking at how brightly the bulb glowed. 

Below is the circuit he used:

 

Conductor-testing circuit

 

Below are a list of the different aspects of the investigation that Zach needs to include in his report. 

 

Place them in the order in which they should appear in that report (1 for 'first', and so on).

CORRECT ANSWER

Column A

Column B

Carrying out the experiments.
2
Drawing conclusions.
5
Planning the investigation.
1
Recording results.
4
Measuring data.
3
Writing the report.
6
EDDIE SAYS
Did that require a bit of thought? It's logical though! Start by planning what you are going to do to answer the question. Then it's time to carry out the experimental work, collect data and record it. Once that's done you should be able to draw some conclusions from the practical work, which leads you to report your findings.
  • Question 2

Zach identified a number of variables which could affect his results. 

 

In which part of his report should he outline what these variables are?

CORRECT ANSWER
Planning the investigation.
EDDIE SAYS
Variables are the 'things' that change and determine the outcome of an investigation, things like temperature, rainfall, light and so on. Here, Zach would include things like an electric current, number of cells, material to test for conductance and so on. He would mention it in the planning section of his report as the variables he is controlling will determine exactly what he does.
  • Question 3

Zach made a prediction: "I expect that the paperclip, the pencil sharpener and the spoon will light the bulb but that the pencil, the ruler and the pad of paper will not."

 

Where in his report should Zach include his prediction?

CORRECT ANSWER
Planning the investigation.
EDDIE SAYS
Think about this: what Zach carries out will be based on his plan and his plan will be determined by what he wants to find out and what he thinks will happen - his prediction. So, when he reports on what he did and what he found out, Zach will include his prediction in the planning section.
  • Question 4

In his report, Zach needs to include a hypothesis

 

Which one of these is a likely hypothesis for his investigation?

 

1. "Metals are good conductors; non-metals don't conduct electricity."

2. "Metals are better conductors of electricity."

3. "I expect that objects made of metal are more likely to conduct than those made on non-metals."

 

CORRECT ANSWER
3
EDDIE SAYS
Options 1 and 2 are simply statements whereas option 3 is an expectation of what Zach predicts will happen. Let's push on.
  • Question 5

Zach had a variety of items to place in the circuit to see whether the bulb would light up.

 

In his report, which of the following would be the best way of displaying his results?

CORRECT ANSWER
A table.
EDDIE SAYS
Zach's findings will record whether the bulb lit up or not, depending on the material tested. It's a simple Yes/No scenario, so a table of results is going to be the simplest way of recording the outcome.
  • Question 6

Here is Zach's prediction again:

 

"I expect that the paperclip, the pencil sharpener and the spoon will light the bulb but that the pencil, the ruler and the pad of paper will not."

 

In his results, he found that the paperclip, pencil sharpener and spoon (all made of metal) made the bulb glow brightly.

 

When he connected the plastic ruler and pad of paper, the bulb didn't light up.

 

The pencil he used looked like this:

 

double-ended pencil

 

When he connected it, Zach found that the bulb glowed dimly.

 

How should Zach reflect these findings in his report? 

Fill in the gaps in this sentence.

CORRECT ANSWER
EDDIE SAYS
This was not a result that Zach was expecting - the pencil (or, the pencil lead) conducted electricity. That meant that Zach had to re-visit his prediction and compare his expectations with his actual data. Therefore, he has to state that his prediction was wrong and identify that when he connected the pencil into the circuit, the bulb glowed.
  • Question 7

What is the name of the substance inside the pencil which is causing this unexpected result in Zach's experiment?

 

 

Pencil

CORRECT ANSWER
Graphite
EDDIE SAYS
Graphite is a type of carbon. Coal, charcoal and diamond are all made of different sorts of carbon. Weirdly, although carbon is not a metal, it's graphite form can conduct electricity. In fact, excitingly scientists at the moment have discovered a special sort, called graphene, which seems to have amazing conducting abilities - the world awaits the results with excitement!
  • Question 8

Zach's original experiment was to find out how well different materials are at conducting electricity. 

 

His results showed him that some materials don't conduct electricity at all, some conduct a little and some conduct it well.

 

Match each of the objects he tested with how well they conduct electricity.

CORRECT ANSWER
 Good ConductorPoor ConductorNon-Conductor/Insulator
Metal paperclip
Sharpened pencil
Paper pad
Metal spoon
Plastic ruler
Metal pencil sharpener
EDDIE SAYS
So, how did you get on? Metals are good conductors, so the spoon, pencil sharpener and paperclip all score well in the conductor stakes as they're made of metal. On the other hand, non-metals are generally insulators so, not surprisingly, the pad of paper and the plastic ruler don't light any bulbs. Finally, we've discovered that the non-metal graphite does, surprisingly, conduct electricity (even if it's not as good at it as metals are), so Zach's sharpened pencil turned out to be a conductor. Phew, that was a challenge!
  • Question 9

In his report, Zach suggested that using the brightness of a bulb to measure how well an object conducts electricity is not a very reliable method for deciding how good a conductor it is.

 

What factors do you think caused Zach to re-think his method for measuring how good a conductor an object is? 

CORRECT ANSWER
It's difficult to measure how brightly a bulb is lit up.
A bulb may allow electric current through without lighting up.
EDDIE SAYS
Zach's right - using the brightness of a bulb to decide how good a conductor something is what's called a subjective decision - that means that you have to decide 'how' bright it is, rather than have something definite to measure. So, deciding on brightness is tough and indeed, current may flow through the filament of a standard bulb without making it glow noticeably. That means that a light bulb is not simply 'on' or 'off' and yes, they're fragile, but that does not impact Zach's experiment.
  • Question 10

Zach decided that a better way to measure how well different materials are at conducting electricity would be to use some sort of "current-measuring meter" (that's what he wrote in his report).

 

Can you help him out with the name of a device that will do the job?

CORRECT ANSWER
Ammeter
EDDIE SAYS
An ammeter is a device that measures electric current. That's measured in a unit called amps, so it's really an amp-meter. You can either get a digital ammeter (with a read-out of the current in numbers) or an analogue ammeter (with a scale measured by a needle that moves to show what the current is). Great work, you've completed another activity! How about attempting another one so you feel super confident?
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